How to Use Snapshot in Scrivener

Using Scrivener Snapshots

In my pre-Scrivener days of writing, I used MS Word. It got the job done, but when it was time to revise I got paranoid.

  • What if I didn’t like all the changes I had just made?
  • What if I liked most of them, but not all?
  • What if deleted an entire scene, then two days later realize I needed that scene after all?

So I learned work arounds… [Read more…]

How to Split and Merge Documents in Scrivener

Scenes are the building blocks of your story. So let’s take a quick look at the definition of a scene.

Jack M. Bickham, in his book Scene & Structure, defines scene this way:

It’s a segment of story action, written moment-by-moment, without summary, presented onstage in the story “now.”

James Scott Bells says in Plot & Structure:

Much of the time a scene takes place in a single location, and almost always is played out in real time.

A scene has a goal, conflict, and a climax in miniature, [Read more…]

How to Use Readability Statistics to Improve Your Manuscript

As writers, we all know how important it is to make our story as strong as possible. We also know that we each have our specific weaknesses in writing.

Maybe for you that weakness is grammar, or spelling, or passive voice.

Maybe you are too wordy.

Today, I’m going to show you how to use MS Word’s readability statistics to help clean up those kinds of errors.  [Read more…]

How to find overused words in your manuscript

Every writer has words she or he uses too often. I call them crutch words. Words like “well, smiled, laughed, however, tears, cried” etc., in addition to adverb usage.

These words aren’t easily spotted when you revise simply because you’re looking at other things like character and plot development.

So today I’m going to show you how to find those words whether you use MS Word or Scrivener. [Read more…]

How to Create the Smartest Indent for a Manuscript

With all the manuscripts I edit or proofread I’ve learned many writers don’t know how to create a proper indent to their paragraphs.

While I can’t unequivocally say that publishers prefer writers use the first line indent, I can say you’ll look like a savvy writer if you do.

The first line indent is formatting that removes the need for the TAB KEY at the beginning of every paragraph. It is the formatting the publisher will eventually use in preparing your manuscript for publication. If you self-publish, this indent is a formatting essential.

Here’s how to create the “first line indent.” [Read more…]

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